[School History Logo]

The History of our Public Schools
Wyandotte County, Kansas

1844
2012

 

 

Site Navigation: History Homepage / Biographies Index / Building Index of Libraries and Schools / Ethnic History of Schools / FAQs - Did You Know? / First Things First / Historian's Roundtable of Wyandotte County / Maps and Land Records / One-Room Schoolhouses / Picture Gallery / Publications, Online Transcriptions, Links / Queries / Copyright/Disclaimer

Contact the History Webmaster - Patricia Adams

Page Divider Bar

Maccochaque SchoolMaccochaque School
(Mack-Ah-Jack)

One-room schoolhouse

The Winding Valley and The Craggy Hillside
A History of the City of Rosedale, Kansas by Margaret Landis. Copyright 1976. Reproduced on the Kansas City, Kansas Public Library web site with permission from Ms. Landis.

Picture Gallery

The original 1-room frame schoolhouse was built in 1876 by James E. Fisher, John W. Green and Solomon Hogue on the East side of Hudson near 42nd Street on land that the Government had given to the Shawnee Indians. The school was a country school known as "District 39" and "Malvern Hill". In 1911, Maccochaque School became a part of the city of Rosedale by extending the City Limits. The 2-story 8-room building was then erected. It was later enlarged to 12 rooms and auditorium. In June 1958, the building and property were sold to the KU Medical Center. Pupils from Maccochaque were transferred to the new Snow School and Thomas A Edison School. After the Maccochaque pupils were transferred, the school served as classroom space for the KU Medical Center School of Practical Nursing. The spring of 1968 the old landmark was torn down and the properly cleared for a parking lot for the KU Medical Center. March 1966, the University-Rosedale Urban Renewal Agency paid $173,000 for 87 acres and Columbian School at 519 Seminary Street, Kansas City, Kansas. In the redevelopment program, the school was razed October 1966. "The Winding Valley and The Craggy Hillside", A History of the City of Rosedale, Kansas by Margaret Landis, Kansas City, Kansas, 1976

(Note:  Mr. Larry Hancks, local historian, informs us that the name "Maccochaque" is the name of one of the five Shawnee tribes, and one of the Shawnee tribes that moved into this area.)

Location:

Other Names: Malvern Hill (also see Frank Rushton and Snow)

Building Closed: 1958 (sold to KU Medical Center in 1959 - later razed for parking area)

Newspaper Articles
04 Apr - 1957 - Legislation Authorizes Sale of School Building to State
10 Oct 1957 - First Maccochaque School Served Very Different Community
04 Jun 1957 - Adieu to a School - Maccochaque Pupils Salute Long Service
08 Jun 1958 - Farewell to Old School
15 Feb 1959 - 'Miss Maccochaque' Marries 'Mr. Snow'
16 Feb 1959 - Just Lookin' Around

Blue Flash Bar Page Divider

The Maccochaque school at Forty-first Street and Rainbow Boulevard will be razed next year to permit the southward expansion of the University of Kansas Medical Center. Four times elementary school buildings have been constructed on the 2-acre site, in 1876, 1880, 1911 and 1923. This story is of the original country school. Its author, Mildred Kittell Ray, is a granddaughter of the first school director, James E. Fisher. The following is from information taken from The Kansas City Star, October 15, 1957.

The old Maccochaque neighborhood from 39th to 43rd Street, west of State Line, was a peaceful rural district in 1875. Rainbow Boulevard was a country dirt road bordered by five pioneer homes. The quiet of this deeply rutted road was broken only by an occasional long horseback rider or a plodding wagon team. Side roads led to other pioneer homes nestled here and there among the trees.

Forty-third street ran directly into Westport, where business thrived. Here were church, school, general store, groceries, dry goods house, blacksmith, harness and wagon repair, tavern and post office.

Over the hill and down in Rosedale stood another school - Whitmore. It faced Southwest Boulevard. A school child from the Maccochaque district walked to Westport or Rosedale, a long walk either way.

James E. Fisher, John W. Green and Solomon Hogue were friends and leaders in this country community. Each had children of school age and each wanted a school nearer home.

The Fisher farm at 43rd and Lloyd streets consisted of 54 acres, part of it purchased from Indians. The 2-story, brick farmhouse, built in 1872, still stood in 1957 and was occupied. Kate and Jessie Fisher were of school age and there were other younger children.

Fisher had brought his family from old Quality Hill in Kansas City, Missouri, far into the country to retire. He had owned a sawmill on the Missouri river and figured the cost of rough lumber as plans were made for a 1-room school. He eventually became the first director of the Maccochaque school.

J. W. Green was a good carpenter. His two daughters, Margaret and Sarah, were ready for school. Mrs. Green was dead. A lovable man to all who remember him, Mr. Green lived to be a hundred years old, spending the remainder of his life in his home at 3801 Rainbow Boulevard.

Solomon Hogue lived in a pioneer log house which was still standing in 1957 on the original site of 4010 Rainbow Boulevard. The house was covered with yellow asphalt siding; the only logs still exposed were the big walnut beams in the cellar. His children, Lida and John, were also motherless. A deeply religious man, thrifty and careful, he became the first treasurer of the Maccochaque school district.

Evenings, especially Fridays, the three men met at one of the homes to play cribbage. Usually the little girls accompanied their fathers and spent the evening popping corn, cracking nuts and making a short knitted wool cord for mats. As the men played their game, they discussed a new school.

In 1876, the one-room school was built, at a location now known as 41st and Rainbow, the site of the Maccochaque School. Its site was part of a land grant from the Shawnee Indians to the state of Kansas, and it was given an Indian name, Maccochaque (pronounced Mack-A-Jack). 

The three men built the modest frame structure with their own hands and served as the first School Board. Miss May Beasley, the first teacher, received $25 a month. She taught reading, writing and arithmetic six hours a day to nine grades.

The one large school room had two long rows of soft pine benches, unvarnished, excellent for carving initials and designs. The 20 pupils included boys and girls of all ages. Some were half-blood Indians. There was no high school; the ninth grade was spent reviewing the previous eighth.

The girls wore their long hair combed straight back and held in place by a firm round comb. Blue calico at 5¢ a yard made girls' dresses and boys' shifts. High-buttoned shoes, copper-toed took the punishment of rough roads and school grounds.

A pot-bellied stove was fed by the older boys of the school who carried wood from a huge pile outside the single door. There was no water at the school, but the Hogue farm home, a block distant, boasted a fine spring. Two of the big boys would fill the cedar bucket with clear, cold water and carried it to the school. Monitors passed the bucket to each child, who helped himself, using the common dipper. In times of drought, the entire neighborhood used this spring, hauling water by barrel for family and livestock.

Games there are still remembered by Jessie Fisher, now Mrs. Irvin Longaker of Sapulpa, Oklahoma, and Lida Hogue, now living in Colorado Springs. Best of all they remember ante over played with a ball thrown over the school house. Coasting in the winter on the hill north of the school was wonderful sport and much more fun than the drop-the-handkerchief game of the girls. At certain times of the year, the boys hunted and shot quail and rabbit on the 2-acre school grounds.

Huge droves of long horned cattle bound for the Kansas City market completely filled the road as they pushed past the schoolhouse. Maccochaque school children walking home from school were warned by great clouds of dust and the loud cries of the drovers, long before the cattle were in sight. The children would race to fences bordering the road and climb over to safety, waiting until the herd passed.

The new Snow School on 43rd between Booth and Fisher (costing $500,000) lies almost directly across the street from the old Fisher farmhouse. Snow School is being expanded to accommodate Maccochaque students after the razing of their building. Fisher Street was named in honor of the pioneer.

Three of the little girls who delighted in the long evenings their fathers played cribbage and planned a school are still living, one from each family. They are Miss Lida Hogue and Jessie Fisher Longaker, mentioned above, and Sarah Green, now Mrs. Robert Green, who lives with her retired husband near New York City. Miss Hogue formerly taught in the Kansas City, Missouri and Colorado Springs schools.

Blue Flash Bar Page Divider

SUMMARY

1876 - Two-acre site, District 39. Part of land grant from Shawnee Indians to state of Kansas. Purchased in 1876 from Rebecca Fitzpatrick, daughter of Captain Joseph Parks, Head Chief of the Shawnee. Fifteen pupils.

First called Malvern School.

Built by J. W. Green, Solomon Hoguand James E. Fisher with their own hands. These three men were the first school board.

Miss Mary Beasley, first teacher.

1880 - One room added. Considered as second elementary school.

First of four elementary schools to be erected on same site at 41st and Rainbow.

1887 - October: Part of district detached by F. M. Slosson, County Superintendent. Annexed to District 15, Rosedale.

1899 - Rosedale people near school wanted teacher at Maccochaque for their children. Board of Education told Rosedale board they would take school District 39's white children at Rosedale's expense. 

1902 - May: Some "Maccochaque Jack", District 39, patrons wanted to join Rosedale.

1905 - February: Rosedale Board of Education talked to Directors of Maccochaque about consolidation. Directors not favorable.

1908 - Annexed to Rosedale schools. Probably January 8.

1911 - Old building to be razed. Now eight-room brick erected on site. Called third school on site. Owen and Payson, architects. School in City of Rosedale.  Named Maccochaque (pronounced Mack-A-Jack).  (Some people say Maccochaque means "place of refreshment."  Larry Hancks of the KC Planning & Zoning tells us that Maccochaque was the name of one of the five Shawnee tribes.)

1920 - First PTA. Mrs. Dwight Greene, president.

1921 - Just prior to the annexation, Kansas Citians wondered about spelling Maccochaque, as various spellings appeared in records, such as Mack-a-jack, Mah-ko-chick, and Mackie-Jack.

1923 - Six-room addition. Called fourth school on site.

1928 - Land along Olathe Boulevard purchased for playground.

1932 - Plot at south of building purchased for school garden. Two hard maples on grounds are memorial to M. E. Pearson, retiring superintendent.

1955 - Decrease to 350 in enrollment. Thomas A. Edison opened in Odell district.

1957 - April 3: Governor George Docking signed bill authorizing state to buy building and site for expansion of KU Medical Center. Maccochaque to combine with Snow School. To use facilities until Snow is enlarged. 1957-58 PTA President: Mrs. D. H. Elvins.

1958 - The last Founder's Day Program on February 2.  Mrs. A. C. Shipley narrated the school's story to an audience who watched old and familiar pictures as they appeared on a screen.  The "old Malvern Hill School" of 1876 was rich in history and former students and patrons were sorry to have it end.

1959 - Snow and Maccochaque students would be assigned to the new Snow School at 2605 W. 43 Avenue.  The name of the school would be changed later to Frank Rushton in honor of Board member from Rosedale who served 20 years as President of Board of Education.

1968 - Razing of building to begin parking lot for KU Med Center. Newspaper article stated, "Medical Center officials say they know of nothing that has created such intense community interest as the demolition of Maccochaque has. Many former students have called the Medical Center wanting souvenirs from the old building. Demolition is expected to be a slow process because the contractor is taking down the walls carefully and selling the souvenir bricks as they come."

PRINCIPALS

1891 - Mr. Meeks / 1893 - Mr. McCoy / 1908-10 - Edna Holsinger / 1910 - Edna Holsinger or Della Maddox / 1911 - Della Maddox / 1913 - G. W. Phillips, declined; Mary Stewart / 1914-19 - Mary Stewart / 1919-34 - Maude Calvin / 1934-43 - Sarah H. Nelson / 1943-58 - Hazel Meeks, retired 1958 / 1958 - School closed June, 1958

Blue Flash Bar Page Divider

Average Daily Attendance (ADA)
1st, 3rd & 6th Weeks Used
(Kdgn & Special Rms not figured in average)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Tot
Tchr
Avg
Kdgn
1922-23
58
65
63
54
53
39
33
365
9
40.6
1923-24
65
55
58
60
65
48
35
386
10
38.6
1924-25
66
54
55
52
57
58
57
399
12
33.3
1925-26
51
66
56
58
56
58
84
429
13
33.0
1926-27
53
47
56
57
49
53
78
393
13
30.2
1927-28
72
56
44
63
53
55
343
11
29.3
1928-29
53
62
57
44
57
49
322
11
29.3
37
1929-30
61
53
55
55
42
59
325
10
32.5
38
1930-31
58
60
61
61
50
43
333
10
33.3
55
1931-32
69
38
70
39
66
64
346
10
34.6
29
1932-33
40
50
57
53
53
58
311
9
3406
37
1933-34
36
34
48
59
51
46
274
8
34.3
13
1934-35
40
39
36
51
58
50
274
7
3901
*14
1935-36
34
34
38
40
44
58
 
248
7
35.4
34
1936-37
47
27
39
35
42
42
 
232
7
33.1
49
1937-38
47
38
33
31
40
46
 
235
6
39.2
27
1938-39
35
41
43
35
31
42
 
227
6
37.8
37
1939-40
40
35
44
41
36
34
 
230
6
38.3
35
1940-41
33
40
32
39
40
32
 
216
6
36.0
42
1941-42
39
32
46
29
43
47
 
236
7
33.7
49
1942-43
47
37
34
45
29
39
 
231
6
38.5
34
1943-44
42
47
35
32
50
38
 
244
7
34.8
48
1944-45
53
40
44
36
30
49
 
252
7
33.7
48
1945-46
41
47
37
45
32
34
 
236
7
33.7
51
1946-47
55
43
45
39
42
35
 
259
7
37.0
61
1947-48
49
48
42
38
34
39
 
250
7
35.7
62
1948-49
54
51
42
44
40
34
 
265
8
33.1
58
1949-50
59
62
58
51
39
37
 
306
9
34.0
66
1950-51
58
58
63
49
55
38
 
321
10
32.1
56
1951-52
60
55
50
65
44
54
 
328
10
32.8
89
1952-53
91
62
63
52
73
43
 
384
11
34.9
92
1953-54
94
91
61
60
49
66
 
421
12
35.0
87
1954-55
88
95
87
58
57
43
 
428
13
32.9
90

(Hanover Heights Historic District)

Blue Flash Bar Page Divider

Maccochaque School

by Margaret E. Morgan - April 11, 1958
Mother of 6th grade student

We wonder what Maccochaque School would say,
As she approaches her final day,
We wonder just what she would try to tell,
Of the stories she knows and loves so well.

Would she tell of the Indians we know were around,
Of the Santa Fe Trail that was made on this ground,
Would her tales be of changes she watched taking place,
Modes of living, of travel, exploring in space.

Or maybe of people she's known, tell about,
For some of her people are famous no doubt,
Of the stories she knows, wonder which one she'd say,
She would like to re-tell to her children today.

Well we know many years, she has patiently heard,
Generations of children repeat word for word,
The salute to the flag, and a soft spoken prayer,
And we know that those children, were proud to be there.

We know of her teachers, she'd speak out in praise,
For the great work they've done, through all of her days,
Among others she'd mention, I'm sure, she would say,
I'm thankful for mothers and their P.T.A.

She'll stand there so silent, no tales will she tell,
Though many among us, know them quite well,
In June '58 as her last school term ends,
She'll silently weep as she loses old friends.

So Good-Luck to our Maccochaque, and the new work she'll do,
Serving, God, Community, Science, and you.

Page Divider Bar

site search by freefind advanced

Download Adobe Acrobat ReaderLinks using reader are marked ( pdf ).
Click icon to download reader.
Use browser's back button to return

Contact the History Webmaster - Patricia Adams

History Site created on December 02, 2002
Page last updated: 23-Apr-2014

Visit the KCKs Public Schools Homepage